A groundbreaking program to help clinicians and institutions in the wake of a prolonged pandemic.

According to The National Institutes of Health, more than half of physicians and more than a third of nurses experience burnout symptoms. And the results can be devastating: diminished patient care, employee retention and medical errors are all tied to burnout. The Thriving Clinician is based on the true stories of hospital clinicians. This isn’t another “just do more yoga” wellness message. The Thriving Clinician tackles difficult topics and promotes a mutually supportive medical culture so that every clinician can thrive.

Approved for up to 2 AAFP CME credits, with equivalency credits offered through AMA, AOA, AAPA, NCCPA, ANCC, AANPCB, AAMA, ABFM, ABEM, ABPM and ABU.

Topics

  • Coping with depression and trauma

  • Setting boundaries

  • Accessing emotionality appropriately

  • Seeking and accepting help

  • Managing technology stressors

  • Leading a team under challenging conditions

Methodologies

  • Scenario Modeling

  • Branching Storylines

  • Decision Points

  • Interactive Exercises

  • Assessments

Playable Characters

Dr. Aarti Patel

Aida Thompkins, RN

Dr. Kyle Green

Jessica Reyes, RN

Dr. Hudson Carey

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Absolutely love this. Genuine, touching, vulnerable, and helpful. Knocked it out of the park! Bravo!!

— MaryEllen Kosturko,
Sr. VP/CNO Bridgeport Hospital,
Yale New Haven Health

Studies estimate that between 35 percent and 54 percent of U.S. nurses and physicians have substantial symptoms of burnout, and the range for medical students and residents is between 45 percent and 60 percent.

Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Supporting Professional Well-Being. National Academy of Medicine. 2019.

The average cost of turnover for a nurse ranges from $37,700 to $58,400. Hospitals can lose $5.2 million to $8.1 million annually on nurse attrition.

2016 National Healthcare Retention & RN Staffing Report

Burnout costs the medical system $4.6 billion a year.

National Academy of Medicine. 2019.

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